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How to Protect your Business from Cyber Crimes

When you hear about major cyber crimes such as the Home Depot and Target security breaches, you probably can’t help but to worry about the security of your own business. Cyber criminals seek out sensitive data, and every business is at risk. But just like you put a security system on your home or an alarm on your car, you can put a metaphorical security fence around your business’s data, too.

The best way to protect yourself, of course, is to identify potential risks and combat them. Here are a few ways you can do that.

Issue: Crimeware. Also known as malware, these are essentially viruses that infiltrate your systems, compromising servers, desktops, and data.
Protection: Ensure you have installed up-to-date anti-virus and anti-malware programs, browsers, and firewalls. Block your systems from Java browser plugins and implement configuration-change monitoring.

Issue: Employee or insider abuse of privileges.
Protection: Require logins for every aspect of your data and keep track of these. Review user accounts so that you can identify abnormal behavior. Audit accounts regularly and monitor any data transfers that go outside of your organization.

Issue: Espionage – the infiltration and gathering of data from outsiders.
Protection: Ensure that all software is patched, especially in areas of weakness, and that anti-virus software is up-to-date.  Keep track of data analytics and train your employees to recognize abnormalities. Make use of secure cloud-based office phones and cloud-based servers to properly track network and application activity – this will help you to better identify inconsistencies.

Issue: POS intrusions, or the access of POS systems by outsiders.
Protection: Limit or ban the access of POS systems from third parties. Enforce the use of password access and keep track of all logins. Limit or prevent the use of POS systems to browse the web or perform any other non-work-related tasks.

Issue: Card skimmers, or the collection of credit card or other payment data. Once a customer has their card skimmed via your company’s data, it’s unlikely that they’ll trust payment with your company again.
Protection: Train employees to spot suspicious behavior and regularly inspect credit card swipers at any brick-and-mortar sale location. Install tamper-evident controls and safety measures such as mirrors on ATMs.

Issue: Other errors
Protection: Have a third-party company manage or maintain your cloud servers if your business doesn’t have the capacity to train your existing IT team. Encrypt all data. Stay on top of software or business system updates and keep all employees in the loop to avoid any application misuses or data breaches.

About Emily Swartz

As the Social Community Manager at Broadview Networks, I enjoy sharing valuable content across all our social platforms. I particularly love writing for our blog because it gives me the opportunity to share tangible advice on how businesses can leverage technology to gain competitive advantages, control costs, provide superior service, and ultimately improve their bottom line. Find me on Google+

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